Managing Home & Homeschooling – A Father's Heartbeat

Managing Home & Homeschooling

There are only so many hours in the day. Times when everything is flowing smoothly, moving in sync and I feel really ‘good’ about myself! Then there are other days when it’s like I’m hitting one-speed bumper after another and I feel a wreck.

Parenting, homeschooling, homemaking, managing work, active involvement in my faith community, just to name a few, keep this Mama going.

But is it all perfectly aligned on all days? Nope. And it doesn’t have to be always. It’s one of the vital lessons I’ve learnt over the years.

So, I don’t have all the right answers to this question on how to manage your home as well as educate your children, but I can share some ideas that have helped me along the way which probably may apply to you.

Delegating

This can save you a LOT of time. Assigning home tasks to kids teaches not only responsibilities but also teach them essential life skills. That being said, there have been instances when I would get tempted to do it myself just because the results would be far better and faster.

But I realised that I need to be willing to invest time in my children in training them to execute tasks well, not perfectly but to ensure that it’s done.

One crucial point to bear in mind for a family with more than one child is to assign children household chores that are age appropriate. It’s effortless to dump all the load on the ‘eldest’ child while the younger one/s escape. Try to divide the work in a way that everyone has a responsibility that suits his/ her age and potential. Always get the younger one to help out as well.

Preparing a daily schedule /routine

Preparing a daily schedule /routine is a huge benefit both for the parent and children. Meal preparation, cleaning, assigning kids to fold the laundry, putting out the trash, do grocery shopping, help wash dishes, and a lot of other stuff not only helps you manage your home well but also teaches kids life skills.

Let each child have his / her own to-do list, which includes chores, playtime, extracurricular activities, with school work at the top. This gives them a sense of responsibility and of course, learning proper time management. So, a mother doesn’t have to be around the clock cop all day 😉

Planning the curriculum structure along with the revised chore chart and meal plans before the academic year begins also gives me a great headstart.

We encourage children to learn independently as far as possible. Our older son works on his own and submits his projects/assignments to us while he prefers oral narration for specific topics. Mathematics is the only subject where he requires extra guidance.

This helps me give a little more time to our younger son, who is at an age where he can read fluently but needs me to facilitate his lessons. He does enjoy independent learning a lot of times, though.

If they bump into obstacles, we teach them to test their limits, overcome fear and embrace and press through those challenges.

Our boys also have a daily quiet time in their rooms (for reading, writing or any other silent activity) especially during the afternoons where they don’t interact with one another.

This gives them space to focus on things that require more concentration as well as lets me check/respond to emails and other work.

Being organised

Homeschooling is a joy and with it sometimes comes clutter too 🙂 I hate looking for things and find it peacefully comforting when things are in place.

The advantage of being organised is that you can focus better and be less distracted. When there’s clutter around, it results in waste of energy, time, money and of course costs you peace of mind.

But I don’t want to get your hopes too high because it’s not possible to always have a perfectly clean and spotless house. I prefer at least a clean kitchen and a clutter-free main living room to start with on days when we have a lot of activities going on.

The last but the most critical point to remember is not to compare yourself to someone else. If I’m not careful, I find that I tend to compare my worst to someone else’s best and forget that my season of life may not be the same as the other person’s.

Just figure out what’s vital for you and your family, look for ways to make that happen, and let the rest go.

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